Earin Will Be the Only Headphones that Matter in 2015

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KickStarter.com has been the root of major crowd-source funding that has paved the way for many cool new gadgets. Since getting funding from firms and banks seem to be as selective as natural selection, Kick Starter has become a corner stone for some gadgets in need of quick cash to get off the ground and the Erin is no exception.

Earin is slated to be the worlds smallest commercial Bluetooth headphone. Yes, we currently have an abundance of Bluetooth headphones, but most only eliminate the cords between the headphones and the phone; there still remained the wired connection between the speakers. On the other hand, Earin has absolutely no chords.

But what makes the Earin so great isn’t it’s simple improvement on old designs and features, it’s competitiveness comes from it’s usability and availability. The Earin will come with a carry case that is so small it can fit on your key-chain and is double featured as a charger. When the Earins are not is use, you simply pop it in the cylindrical case and it’ll charge away. By itself, Earin will last 3-5 hours and another 3-5 hours if you have the charging capsule with you.

Once you go through the initial setup, the Earins will work the second you remove them from the capsule. Meaning that it knows that once it’s not charging or in the case, it needs to pair itself to your phone or device.

For those of you looking to count on the Earins for hardcore usage like sports, the Earins will come with a concha lock that decrease the likeliness of it falling out your ear (good luck finding them if they do).

The Earin is also compatible with Bluetooth 3.0 and Bluetooth 4.0. It weights just 5 grams while the capsule weights 25 grams. The Kick Starter project has already reached its goal of £179,000 and totaled in with £724,331 to date with 6,339 backers. The device will launch in January 2015 for £79 which translates to roughly $110 USD.

About the author

Tristan Thomas

Currently studying Information Technology at Georgia Southern University, Tristan uses Tech Analyzer as a venting outlet for how he interprets the technological world around him.

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